Author Archives: SusanKelly22

About SusanKelly22

I love to help other Internet Marketers learn to build a list and how to find the best FREE programs to help them do it. I write blogs and design websites. I am webmaster of http://salem-construciton..com and :: http:howtolivegreenwithsuekelly.com We live in CT We have grandchildren:3 girls and 3 boys We work in internet marketing. We love to help other Internet marketers to become expert List Builders.

Ideas for Reducing Attic Heat

Attics get very warm in the summertime. So what’s the best way to beat that heat? Many companies want you to believe that there is only one solution to fixing the temperature in your attic. But no one product will necessarily make your home more energy efficient. Here are six different ways to reduce the temperature in your attic and save you money.

 

  1. Try using a thermostatically controlled roof mounted ventilator.They will help to keep your attic much cooler in the summertime. The thermostat will usually start at 95 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the temperature that the attic fan usually starts at.

  1. Using insulation only keeps the attic’s heat from traveling through your home. But by adding powered attic fans, you will draw more air into the attic. While it does help to reduce the heat in your attic, putting these fans in your attic costs more because of the loss of conditioned air. The air you lose from the attic is then drawn into your home from the outside, which will cause your cooling bill to go up.

  1. Radiant barrier: This is a coating material that gets sprayed onto the outside of your roof to help reduce the amount of heat that is radiated into your attic. The radiant barrier is shown to reduce about 68% of the heat that is being radiated into the attic. This will keep your attic cooler, which will reduce the cooling load on your home.

  1. Continuous ridge vent: This type of vent runs along the entire ridge of your roof. It is placed at the highest point of your roof so that the hot air rises to get out. However, for best results you must have sufficient vents to allow for the free airflow. The biggest downside to this type of cooling system, though, is that you must install it when you are installing either a new roof or building a new home. This type of venting wouldn’t work properly on an already existing roof.

  1. Standard “Turtle-back” vents: These are the most common vents for people to have and are very effective when enough of them are installed. These vents can be placed on an existing roof, and will allow for a lot of airflow when properly installed.

 

  1. Be sure to check for restricted vents. Your vents can get clogged from dirt, rust, or insulation that was blown in from the attic. Make sure they are all open and will allow for the maximum amount of air to pass through.

Best Time

The best time to make these types of repairs to your attic is during the wintertime when it is much cooler and a lot more bearable to fix the cooling in your attic. Just make sure you think ahead before the summertime, because many people don’t think they’ll need any sort of repairs until the problem is already there.

 

So what are you waiting for? Start saving money on your energy costs by cooling down your attic.

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What’s New At HowTo Live Green With Sue Kelly

Two new posts have been added.

Adult Size Tricycles With Electric Motor

Adult Size Tricycles With Electric Motor

Put Away The Shovel

Put Away The Shovel

I have checked out the Subscribe button
I then printed out the subscriber list which Totaled 6006 subscribers.

You will find the donate button on the page entitled I Appreciate Donations
I put on a new Social website share button.

I put on and email news letter program.


I have a How To Live Green With Sue Kelly Fan Page on Facebook.
To this I added a closed group which means you need to register for it. It will simply say join the group. This is is a place where you can leave the url for your blog. Please make sure the sites cover some aspect of living green which you can see is a wide field.
But no putting on Creative writing , no game sites, no farmica prescription sites. What I have against these is if a man goes to his doctor and asks for a prescription for Viagra and his Dr. says no not in your present condition. Instead of following orders to get in a better condition, he goes to one of these sites to buy it on his own and uses it and dies of a heart attack.
I put a chat program on the original site.
I created a Forum the access Is https://suekelly.discussion.community

The forum it turns out  is free for 14 days and then 39.00 per month to be paid for a year in advance which is $468.00 or %49.00  per month  if paid by the month.  I will need to rethink this and perhaps get a separate domain called  howtolivegreenwithsuekellycommunity.com in the meantime I will publish the news Letter as a new post. http://howtolivegreenwithsuekelly.com/?p=785&preview=true

Put Away The Shovel

Sue And Shawn Kelly

Have you never attempted or given up on a vegetable garden. Was it too much like work.
Or do you think your yard is too small for a garden. In the 2016 Farmers Almanac I found this great design to get around all that. Plus it is a raised garden which will both save your back and make it more difficult for the animals to attack the fruits of your labors. It is a pie wedge garden with one wedge left out so you can get into the center in which you will create a hardware cloth round tube  which you will fill with compost , shredded news paper, and some worms to create compost and nourishment for you crops. Each pie wedge is separated from the next so you easily keep the pants from mingling with each other including herbs which tend to want to take over.

 

The design was first used by missionaries to help natives grow food. The compost area in the center is great for waste from preparing food as well as weeds and plants who have reached the end of the season such as early spring peas. Then that section can be used for a latter crop such as turnips or squash.
1. Measure a six foot diameter circle to mark the wall. On the north side notch the circle like a wedge of pie for access to the center.
2. Using the measured area to guide you, build the wall about 3 feet high using rocks, metal edging , broken bricks or any material that can support the weight of wet soil.
3. Use wire mesh to form a basket or tube about 1 foot in diameter and 4 ft. high. Place it in the center of the circle.
4. Line the inside wall with cardboard.
5. Fill the bed with layers of compost materials wetting them as you go.
6. Top with a few inches of compost or potting soil making sure that the mix slops from the high point of he center basket downward to the to the wall.

 

Nicolas McGee filled the keyhole with garden soil used potting soil compost and shredded leaves to provide moisture and nutrients
7. Fill the center basket with alternate layers of compost able material along with layers of vegetable scraps and green weeds. This will provide moisture and nutrients.
8. Water the center basket and the garden only when the leaves begin to wilt. This will force the roots toward the center basket for moisture and the nutrients.
9. Feed the garden by adding vegetable scraps, lawn clippings and other compostable material to the center baske

Adult Size Tricycles With Electric Motor

Many people are seeking an energy efficient way to get around town. They are using bicycles for exercise and perhaps to go to the gym or the library or bank. But what if you want to save more and carry more such as to get groceries or take the kids to the park. The new trend is to go to a tricycle with larger baskets to carry groceries or produce from the farm market or to go to the community garden.

Adult size electric Tricycles may be your answer.

The MotoTec Electric Powered Trike aka Personal Transporter is a three wheel electric scooter that you can ride while sitting or standing, this makes it very convenient for use at events, security and

There are other models that  which will carry one or two adults Tricycles give you alternative transportation  around town.  Transport your tike behind your  RV to have a source of short trips  to stores , gift shops and sites at your destination.

But there is the top of the line Tricycle that will carry up to three adults.
It is covered with a windshield for all inclement weather.
It has a battery under the driver’s seat to run the accessories and motor .
The battey will last three years
All passengers pedal and the electric motor helps climb hills i
Watch the video and see all that you can do with this alternate vehicle. No Fossil fuels here.

Tricycle.For.3.People.(Max.Speed.45.km/h)

Melaleuca Preferred Customers Who Enroll In November And December Can Offer $1 Annual Memberships Until January 23rd

 

1 Reply

Sue And Shawn Kelly

Sue And Shawn Kelly

Jan 2st-Jan 31st 2018

1dollar kits with First Order

of 35 Product pts.

MONTHLY UPDATE

 

January 1-31 Enroller Promotion!

We’re making it easier than ever to reach your goals this January with one of our biggest promotions ever! Whether you’re trying to improve your health or build your busines, qualifying for the January Enroller Promotion is the perfect tool to get you started.

Enroll 2* Preferred Members during January 1-31 and receive a
Slim-Down Bundle or Tone-Up Bundle!

Slim-Down Bundle Includes:

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Tone-Up Bundle Includes:

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Have dietary restrictions? These bundles are also available in a SELECT version.

Qualifiers will receive a confirmation email. Your products will be placed in your next order following the receipt of your confirmation email. 
Enroll 4* Preferred Members during January 1-31 and receive everything from the “Enroll 2” promotion, plus a Peak Performance Total Health Pack and Fitbit Flex 2:

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Qualifiers will receive a confirmation email. Your products will be placed in your next order following the receipt of your confirmation email. 
Enroll 8** Preferred Members during January 1-31 and receive everything from the “Enroll 4” and “Enroll 2” promotions, plus a Blendtec Designer 625 branded with the Melaleuca logo!

Valued at $499.95, the Blendtec Designer 625 is beautiful, powerful, and highly functional. This top-of-the-line blender comes with a variety of features and blend settings so you get the perfect results every time. Go to Blendtec Designer 625 to learn more.

  • All items in the “Enroll 4” and “Enroll 2” promotions.
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  • 0 peak horsepower motor
  • Illuminated Touch Controls
  • Preprogrammed Blend Cycles: Smoothie, Ice Cream, Whole Juice, Hot Soup
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*To qualify, new Members must be enrolled January 1-31, 2018 and be quality enrolled by the end of the month.

A Quality Enrollment is a new Preferred Member who completes their membership paperwork and places an order of at least 35 Product Points (Preferred Membership Pack orders do not count) on or before January 31, 2018.

Only new Preferred Members enrolled in the US or Canada count towards this promotion.

**To qualify, new Preferred Members must be enrolled January 1-31, 2018 and be quality enrolled by the end of the month. They must also remain active customers as of February 28, 2018.

January 1-31, 2018

MONTHLY UPDATE

 

FREE Gift for ALL New Preferred Members

All new Preferred Members who enroll in January will receive a FREE bottle of customer-favorite Renew Intensive Skin Therapy, valued at $9.99, in their first active order!

Read More

January 1-23, 2018

MONTHLY UPDATE

 

All Preferred Members can offer $1 Melaleuca Memberships January 1-23!

Read More

BUSINESS UPDATE

 

Find Your Local Leadership Celebration Event!

During the first week of every month, Melaleuca Marketing Executives across North America attend their local Leadership Celebration events to celebrate thousands of advancements, build relationships, and develop action plans! Nothing exemplifies your commitment to change your life like hosting and attending Leadership Celebrations.

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BUSINESS UPDATE

 

Understanding the Enhanced Product Introduction Commission

Learn how every enroller benefits from the new Enhanced Product Introduction Commission! This simple bonus chart is perfect for sharing with new business builders.

BUSINESS UPDATE

 

Listen to Latest Melaleuca Podcasts with Darrin Johnson

How is Melaleuca changing the lives of everyday people? Senior Vice President of Sales Darrin Johnson joins Marketing Executives from all over North America and asks about the impact that Melaleuca is having on their lives and families.

New Upcoming Podcasts:

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RECENT POSTS

 

Apply Reduce, Reuse, Recycle While Going Green In The Kitchen

 

Going green in the kitchen encompasses everything from what you eat to how you cook it  There are tons of things you can do in your kitchen that will help lessen your impact on the environment. From using a water saving faucet, to energy efficient appliances to cleaning with non-toxic cleaners, going green in the kitchen can be great for the environment as well as for your budget.

 

 

REDUCE

One little thing you can do is reduce your use of paper towels.  The average family uses several rolls of paper towels a week but you can reduce your usage by keeping some cloth towels handy in the kitchen and use those for wiping your hands,  spills and other uses that would normally call for a paper towel. I like micro fiber cloths  You’ll save money on paper towels and there will be less of them in the landfill which, in turn, helps the environment  Also, the less paper towels that are manufactured, the less pollution in the air from those manufacturing plants.

Use microfiber cloths to clean up spills. They are also great to clean glass, stainless steel, and stove tops, microwaves etc. By doing this you reserve the use of paper towels for draining bacon and other fried foods. Use cloth napkins, avoid paper, Styrofoam and other convenience items Reduce by Using rags for items like scratch cover polish and just throw them away. Also use rags for other chores like cleaning cabinets, walls , woodwork and floors. These can be washed and reused as long as there is any use left in them.

REUSE

Any Item can be reused including clothes, rags, furniture, Glass jars,  Just think a minute and you will add a lot to the list.  I save paper from the printer like that last page they just have to add on at the end with one sentence on it. I cut them in half 5 1/2 x 8 and clip a stack with one of those big black clips to form a pad. why buy steno pads when this work just as well. You reduce the need to make more paper. You reuse  the paper at hand , and when it is no longer needed you recycle the paper you wrote on.

 

Did you realize that some types of cooking are more energy efficient than others?  While many cooks love a gas stove, the fact is that the newer model electric stoves are more energy efficient  Not only that, but if you opt for a toaster oven or microwave instead of using your big oven, you can drastically reduce the energy needed for cooking. Another method of cooking that greatly reduces the amount of energy being used are convection ovens. Many microwaves have convection oven features in them  use it whenever possible as it cooks more evenly and saves a great deal of energy.

Reduce the cost of Energy with LED Bulbs

I save quite a bit by putting dimmer capable Led bulbs in the fan light. You can dim them down to use as a night light. The electric company gives you 5 Led bulbs if you bring incandescent bulbs in to their scheduled day, I t is held approximately once a month. In our town it is held at the senior center.  My favorite place to by bulbs is  Batteries & bulbs and more. I  bought some dimmable bulbs there last week and the electric company  pays them a rebate. On one package of bulbs I saved &7.00.

REFUSE

Another thing you can do in the kitchen to help the environment is buy local whenever you can. While this might seem like a small thing, transporting food is actually a big drag on the environment. Flying bananas into upstate New York from the tropics can be costly in terms of air pollution.  Not to mention that foods from the grocery store can be loaded with pesticides which damage the environment and your health with GMO’s  Your local growers probably don’t put so much junk on their crops.  Plus, it’s nice to support the farmers in your own community. We have a farm market on the town Green every Wednesday & Sunday. Seniors can get a book of coupons at the Sr. Center. Each coupon is worth $3.00. We also have  produce stand at one of the gas stations and another stand at a nursery in a nearby town.  Just google for farm markets in your area.

 

Using reusable cloth grocery bags, reusing jars I use canning jars for leftovers  This also saves because you can see what is in the jar and it doesn’t get forgotten to be lost. Composting organic materials are great ways to reduce waste.  You can compost your kitchen scraps, paper and even cardboard.  This will make great fodder for your garden and does double duty as it acts as an organic fertilizer saving you from buying fertilizer which saves you money and ensures that harmful chemicals don’t leach into the environment from commercial fertilizers you might have had to purchase.

Note: Some paper is needed to have a proper mix.

RECYCLE

Possibly the most important thing you can do to be greener in the kitchen is to recycle. Make sure you get a good handle on all the plastic and glass materials you use that can be recycled.  Check the rules at your landfill as to what has to be separated out and buy yourself some bins to help you keep things separate. My goal is to get enough people recycling so much that they pick u[ recycling every week and trash twice a month.

 

Lastly, you want to keep the environment in mind when you clean. Cleaners full of chemicals can be bad for the environment and the fumes from these can be harmful to the health of yourself and your family.  There are plenty of natural things you can use for cleaning like vinegar, baking soda and tea tree oil that will help keep your kitchen sparkling without harming you or the environment.

I recommend Melaleuca products. I have used them exclusively since 2005

http://www.melaleuca.com/susankelly

Fracking Effects Environment Air Water Soil Weather Health

Fracking effects the environment including air, water, soil weather and health. Who is concerned and what are they doing about it,  What measures are proposed and what are the people affected doing to take action

What is fracking: Using millions of gallons of water and secret chemicals, oil and gas companies crack open underground rock formations, forcing deposits of oil and gas tucked deep within the earth up to the surface.

There is great controversy about this process, combined with industry deregulation, this has landed our country smack in the middle of an ill-timed oil and gas rush.

Seemingly determined to get every last drop of oil and pocket of gas, the industry has worked itself into a  31-state frenzy, drilling next to homes, schools, even in the middle of cemeteries. They’re polluting air and water, making people sick, hurting communities and delaying our transition to clean, safe, renewable energy.

People Are Making a Joint Effort To Not Allow Fracking In Their Communities  Fight Back NOW!

dryden-court-appeals_cjb_800

People are joining together because they feel they have the right to control what comes into their  community that will be harmful to the environment and the health of their families. Earth Justice is fighting alongside them—in the courts and in communities. Every day we are fighting to keep fracking out of places where it doesn’t belong, working to protect people impacted by this dangerous practice, and challenging fracked oil and gas infrastructure projects that will lock us into a future dependent on fossil fuels.

Together, we can keep communities safe and help our renewable energy economy flourish.

 

  • UnFracktured Communities: In communities across the country, people are standing up to the fracking industry, passing bans and limits on fracking and defending their right to do so in court. And when the oil and gas industry tries to bully communities into backing down, communities are fighting back—and winning.
  • Fracking and Community Control: Experts from New York, Colorado, California, Pennsylvania and Texas hosted a teleconference on the growing trend of community control over fracking.
  • Using Municipal Zoning to Limit or Ban Fracking in California Communities: Legal experts discuss options available to California communities that want to limit or ban fracking and other methods of oil and gas development.

The oil and gas industry may wish it were otherwise, but municipalities have the right to determine what types of development are appropriate within their borders.

We are firmly committed to defending that right.

Mary Ann Sumner

Town Supervisor of Dryden, NY, an Earth Justice client

Learn about Dryden’s fight.

 

 

One of the Items of most concern is water pollution. Have they really forgotten Love Canal and the famous victory of Erin Brockovich. Are we the citizens of the U.S so inconsequential to the profits of the oil companies?

Fracking’s problems go deeper than water pollution.

Salty, chemical-laden fluid leaked for two hours before anyone from Vantage Energy let Arlington city officials knew there had been an accident at the hydraulic fracturing well next to the Baptist church. It would be another 22 hours before they plugged the leak. In that time, 42,800 gallons of polluted liquid would flow into the sewers and streams of this suburban city wedged between Dallas and Fort Worth.

That was two months ago, and this week Arlington officials announced their investigation into the accident—caused by equipment failure—was complete. After taking water and soil samples, they announced that the waste water spewed from the well did not cause any significant damage to the environment. Vantage Energy’s biggest sin was not notifying the city of the accident when it first occurred. Even with this conclusion, the spill has raised concerns in frack-friendly Texas and beyond.

Companies  claim natural gas has is the bridge fuel—the climate-friendly alternative that will fuel society until green energy gets up to scale.

Then faucets started catching fire in Pennsylvania.  Earthquakes started shaking Oklahoma City. And evidence started accumulating that indicates the gas itself is a bigger threat to the climate than coal.

But all these problems tie back to the processes used to produce natural gas. The question is, could these processes be fixed so natural gas fulfills its promise as a climate change panacea?

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, uses high-pressure slugs of chemicals, water, and sand to crack shale formations deep underground, unlocking methane gas trapped therein. America has been fracking since the ’40s, but production didn’t really take off until 2005. That year, the Bush Administration’s EPA exempted fracking from the Safe Drinking Water Act. This opened the fracking floodgates. “Half of shale gas produced in history has been produced in the last 4 years or so,” says Robert Howarth, an environmental scientist at Cornell University.

Even though they claim accidents like the one in Texas are rare. Things like burning faucets in Pennsylvania show that injection isn’t always permanent. In this case though, it would be wrong to focus on fracking’s waste water disposal problem—a single barrel of oil produces ten barrels of waste water. “The appropriate response is to figure out better well casing and surface handling procedures for all oil and gas,” writes Danny Reible, a chemical engineer at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, in an email.

Another solution is treating the water, either so it can be recycled and used again for other oil or gas projects, or clean enough for drinking or agriculture. The biggest hurdle to both options is logistics. Relying on treated water means a frack or oil play might not have water on demand. And shipping waste fluid to a treatment plant takes trucks, pipes, or trains. Infrastructure like that costs big money. Also, trucks can crash, pipes can burst, and trains can spill. It seems like water flows to places that are very inconvenient for gas industry public relations people.

And filthy water isn’t the only thing these wells belch out. Groundwater injection has also been linked to earthquakes. So far most have been relatively small—though some have reached up to 5.7 moment magnitude—but they happen in places where people are unused to the ground shaking. “In a few places because there have been earthquakes bigger than 4.5 and 5.5 caused by humans. The codes here aren’t used to them,” says Cliff Frohlich, a seismologist at the University of Texas in Austin. “The sensible approach would be to have zoning where you’re not doing injection disposal in the middle of cities like Dallas or Oklahoma City.”

Frohlich nominates the vast empty spaces of west Texas, where a 5.5 earthquake would shake like a tree falling in a forest with no one around to hear it. But, he points out, shipping the water to be injected elsewhere has the same logistical problems as does treating it. “You have to ship it, it spills, you’re dealing with chemicals,” Frohlich says. “People are probably more exposed to the water if you treat it than if you pump it into the ground.”

Then there’s the methane problem. Despite all the worries over fracking, natural gas is clean-burning. In the climate change-worried world of environmentalism, this has been the trump card. The issue is with methane that escapes before it can be burned. Over the past four years, a series of research papers have shown that fracking has very likely caused a huge increase in atmospheric methane.

Methane is a greenhouse gas, which means it traps energy and turns it into heat. And it is particularly potent. “If you cut methane emissions, you would stop global warming over the next few decades,” says Howarth, who was among the first to notice that fracking wells were releasing the gas. Shutting off these near-term temperature increases from methane would take some spark out of the fuse on the carbon bomb set to go off in the next few decades. (Carbon dioxide is a more potent greenhouse gas, but takes many decades to release its stored energy as heat.) “This idea that methane gas is a bridge fuel, is better than coal, is nonsense,” he says. Stronger regulations could help curb these unintentional emissions, but Howarth says resistance from gas companies means scientists still don’t know the extent of the threat.

The common thread in all these problems—and their potential solutions—is uncertainty. Uncertainty is the story of fracking. Recent changes—like a federal law passed in March making it mandatory for companies to disclose the ingredients used in each well—have helped, but each flow like that seems to be accompanied by an ebb. Like the Texas legislature’s decision last month to make it illegal for municipalities—like Arlington—to ban hydraulic fracturing. Speaking of Arlington, that faulty well has been repaired, and is one inspection away from reopening.

Public health and gas development

Where oil and gas development goes, health problems often follow.

Yet industry representatives and policymakers seeking to expand drilling often dismiss claims of health impacts as “personal anecdotes” and isolated incidents.

The primary reasons that public health risks posed by increasing gas development can be disputed:

  • A lack of established science. Widespread scientific investigation has only recently begun to investigate the relationship between gas development and public health impacts.
  • State governments, which are largely responsible for protecting the public from irresponsible oil and gas development, have until recently refused to consider the issue.
  • Even as they have become widespread, individual reports of health problems in the gas patch have been continually dismissed as anecdotal by industry and government.

To investigate the connection, between August 2011 and July 2012 Earthworks’ Oil & Gas Accountability Project (OGAP) researched the extent, types, and possible causes of health symptoms experienced by people living in the gas patches of Pennsylvania.

The main conclusions of the project — Gas Patch Roulette: How Shale Gas Development Risks Public Health in Pennsylvania:

  1. Contaminants associated with oil and gas development are present in air and water in many communities where development is occurring.
  2. Many residents have developed health symptoms that they did not have before—indicating the strong possibility that they are occurring because of gas development.
  3. By permitting widespread gas development without fully understanding its impacts to public health—and using that lack of knowledge to justify regulatory inaction—Pennsylvania and other states are risking the public’s health.

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Public Health Effects of Fracking Need Study, CDC Scientist Says

The U.S. should study whether hydraulic fracturing used to free natural gas from wells is a hazard to people or food sources, a top official at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

 

  1. rector of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health and Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. The Environmental Protection Agency, which is preparing regulations to govern fracking with the Interior Department, plans to study the effect of the drilling procedure, also known as fracking, on drinking water. Additional studies

should examine whether wastewater from the wells can harm people or animals and vegetables they eat, said Christopher Portier,

 

 

“We do not have enough information to say with certainty whether shale gas drilling poses a threat to public health,” he said in an e-mail sent by Vivi Abrams, a spokeswoman.

President Barack Obama has lauded increased natural gas drilling as a way to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and on coal, which is more damaging to the environment when burned. Officials in his administration have been cautious when discussing possible health effects of hydraulic fracturing.

The EPA “will use its authorities to protect local residents if a driller endangers water supplies and the state and local authorities have not acted,” the agency’s administrator, Lisa Jackson, told Congress in May. Obama, she said, “has made clear that we need to extract natural gas without polluting our water supplies.”

Monitor Exposure

The fracking process injects water, sand and chemicals into deep shale formations to free natural gas. The compounds used should be monitored, Portier said, and drinking water wells should be tested before and after drilling. Studies also should address “all the ways people can be exposed” to fracking products, including through air, water, soil, plants and animals.

Increased use of the process has raised gas production, reduced prices 32 percent last year and spurred questions about the environmental effects.

The U.S. has sought to dismiss a lawsuit brought by New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman against federal agencies, seeking stronger regulation of fracking at as many as 18,000 wells in his state. The petroleum industry says the lawsuit could shut down drilling in the Delaware River Basin “for many years to come” if successful.

‘Effective’ Regulation

“Measures required by state regulatory agencies in the exploration and production of deep shale natural gas and oil formations have been very effective in protecting drinking water aquifers from contamination attributable to fracking,” Chesapeake Energy, the second-largest producer of natural gas, said in a document in September explaining the process.

Portier wouldn’t say whether fracking should be stopped or more tightly regulated until studies are completed.

“Our role is to determine what the risks are, and it is up to the public to decide if they are OK with that risk,” he said.

U.S. natural gas production rose to a record 2.5 trillion cubic feet in October, a 15 percent increase from October 2008, the month before Obama was elected, according to an Energy Information Administration report issued Dec. 28.

Some “data of concern” are showing up at fracking sites, Portier said. Fluids used in drilling contain “potentially hazardous chemical classes” including petroleum distillates, volatile organic compounds and glycol ethers. Wastewater may also contain salts and be radioactive, he said.

In December, the EPA said for the first time that it had found chemicals consistent with those used in drilling in groundwater near wells in Wyoming. The driller, Encana Corp., has disputed the agency’s findings.

Methane, Earthquakes

Pennsylvania regulators warned residents near Scranton not to drink well water in September 2010 after methane was detected in the Susquehanna River and in wells near drilling sites.

Youngstown, Ohio residents say they’ve experienced earthquakes since D&L Energy Inc. began injecting fracking wastewater into a 9,300-foot disposal well. Ben Lupo, president and chief executive officer of the company, said he doesn’t think his well is causing the temblors.

While the federal government prepares fracking regulations, states also monitor the process, which has led the industry to complain of unnecessary supervision.

The Obama administration is pursuing “an incoherent approach to natural gas development” by promoting its benefits while “ratcheting up pressure for new layers of duplicative regulations,” said Jack Gerard, president of the American Petroleum Institute, in remarks prepared for a speech today.

The institute represents more than 490 energy companies including Exxon Mobil Corp., the world’s largest company by market value.

 

 

 

Flikr creative commons: ProgressOhio

Natural gas from rock thousands of feet underground. The fracking process includes pumping millions of gallons of water, sand and toxic chemicals (including carcinogens) underground.

Evidence suggests that this risky process affects the water we drink, air we breathe, food we eat and climate we rely on for comfort. And like all oil and gas efforts, it endangers the wild places we love dearly. Here’s the ugly evidence:

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  1. Fracking disrupts and threatens wild lands

Fracking negatively impacts wild lands treasured by all Americans. Lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the Rocky Mountain West. Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico contain some of the most spectacular American landscapes but are also coveted for their natural gas resources. This spring, the BLM did announce a new policy for chemical disclosure on leased lands. The Wilderness Society strongly supports setting more stringent standards because these proposed rules don’t require public disclosure about fracking chemicals until after the drilling has been completed.

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  1. Fracking contaminates drinking water

Last fall, the EPA released a report showing that fracking had contaminated groundwater in Wyoming, sparking a deluge of speculation about water pollution as a consequence of natural gas extraction. The evidence was used to back a claim that Pennsylvania water wells were polluted with methane. The New York Times’ own investigation in the state showed levels of radiation well beyond federal drinking-water standards. In places like Texas, it’s harder to get evidence, which some suspect is because of conflicts of interest.

There are 29 states with fracking in some stage of development or activity. Here is a map showing the location of U.S. shale gas plays, or shale formations in which natural gas is trapped (data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) courtesy of data.fractracker.org):

 

  1. Fracking pollutes the air with scary pollutants

Since Garfield County, Colorado has experienced fracking development, residents who live within a half mile of the natural gas wells have been exposed to air pollutants, like the carcinogen benzene and toxic hydrocarbons known to cause respiratory and neurological problems, according to a three-year study from the Colorado School of Public Health. Colorado allows companies to drill for natural gas within 150 feet of homes, so nearby residents could be facing acute and chronic health problems like leukemia in the long-term.

  1. Global warming gone overboard

In some ways, the most significant air pollutant is methane, a greenhouse gas that traps 20 to 25 times more heat in the atmosphere than does carbon dioxide. While some claim that the cost is worth the benefits if it means we can transition away from fossil fuels, it has been shown that the “footprint” of shale gas is actually 20 percent higher than coal.

  1. Even if you don’t drink the water, animals will

Of course, water pollution not only affects human populations, it affects other wildlife as well. This should concern anyone who eats meat, whether they hunt it or purchase it indirectly from a farm, which may incidentally be near a fracking well. In addition to degradation of habitat and interference with migration and reproduction, farmers have reported illness and death among domestic animals exposed to fracking wastewater.

  1. Fracking also causes earthquakes?

Hydraulic fracturing involves pumping massive amounts of water into the earth’s crust to break apart rock, so it should be no surprise that small earthquakes that have occurred in Ohio and Arkansas have been linked to nearby wastewater wells. The wastewater wells take in the water used to fracture the rock, and because the water is thousands of feet underground, it is under very high pressure. Since thousands of these new wells are being developed in populated areas, even small earthquakes are alarming for most of these areas haven’t been seismically active in the past.

  1. Despite recorded health risks, the facts are hard to find.

Fracking takes advantage of loopholes in federal laws designed to protect drinking water, so the chemicals used in drilling are not required by federal law to be publicly disclosed. Disclosure requirements for fracking chemicals differ widely from state to state, but the majority of states with fracking have no disclosure rules at all (only 14 out of the 29 have any). The rules that do exist are inadequate, failing to require disclosure of many important aspects, such as:

  • pre-fracking disclosure of all the chemicals that may be used (this makes it impossible to trace and prove the source of water contamination if it arises)
  • disclosure of the concentration of all chemicals
  • full disclosure to medical professionals in the event of an accident because of “trade secret” exemptions

Even for those states with laws, enforcement isn’t strict.

See also:

 

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The Environmental Protection Agency, which is preparing regulations to govern fracking with the Interior Department, plans to study the effect of the drilling procedure, also known as fracking, on drinking water. Additional studies should examine whether wastewater from the wells can harm people or animals and vegetables they eat, said Christopher Portier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health and Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

“We do not have enough information to say with certainty whether shale gas drilling poses a threat to public health,” he said in an e-mail sent by Vivi Abrams, a spokeswoman.

President Barack Obama has lauded increased natural gas drilling as a way to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and on coal, which is more damaging to the environment when burned. Officials in his administration have been cautious when discussing possible health effects of hydraulic fracturing.

The EPA “will use its authorities to protect local residents if a driller endangers water supplies and the state and local authorities have not acted,” the agency’s administrator, Lisa Jackson, told Congress in May. Obama, she said, “has made clear that we need to extract natural gas without polluting our water supplies.”

Monitor Exposure

The fracking process injects water, sand and chemicals into deep shale formations to free natural gas. The compounds used should be monitored, Portier said, and drinking water wells should be tested before and after drilling. Studies also should address “all the ways people can be exposed” to fracking products, including through air, water, soil, plants and animals.

Increased use of the process has raised gas production, reduced prices 32 percent last year and spurred questions about the environmental effects.

The U.S. has sought to dismiss a lawsuit brought by New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman against federal agencies, seeking stronger regulation of fracking at as many as 18,000 wells in his state. The petroleum industry says the lawsuit could shut down drilling in the Delaware River Basin “for many years to come” if successful.

‘Effective’ Regulation

“Measures required by state regulatory agencies in the exploration and production of deep shale natural gas and oil formations have been very effective in protecting drinking water aquifers from contamination attributable to fracking,” Chesapeake Energy, the second-largest producer of natural gas, said in a document in September explaining the process.

Portier wouldn’t say whether fracking should be stopped or more tightly regulated until studies are completed.

“Our role is to determine what the risks are, and it is up to the public to decide if they are OK with that risk,” he said.

U.S. natural gas production rose to a record 2.5 trillion cubic feet in October, a 15 percent increase from October 2008, the month before Obama was elected, according to an Energy Information Administration report issued Dec. 28.

Some “data of concern” are showing up at fracking sites, Portier said. Fluids used in drilling contain “potentially hazardous chemical classes” including petroleum distillates, volatile organic compounds and glycol ethers. Wastewater may also contain salts and be radioactive, he said.

In December, the EPA said for the first time that it had found chemicals consistent with those used in drilling in groundwater near wells in Wyoming. The driller, Encana Corp., has disputed the agency’s findings.

Methane, Earthquakes

Pennsylvania regulators warned residents near Scranton not to drink well water in September 2010 after methane was detected in the Susquehanna River and in wells near drilling sites.

Youngstown, Ohio residents say they’ve experienced earthquakes since D&L Energy Inc. began injecting fracking wastewater into a 9,300-foot disposal well. Ben Lupo, president and chief executive officer of the company, said he doesn’t think his well is causing the temblors.

While the federal government prepares fracking regulations, states also monitor the process, which has led the industry to complain of unnecessary supervision.

The Obama administration is pursuing “an incoherent approach to natural gas development” by promoting its benefits while “ratcheting up pressure for new layers of duplicative regulations,” said Jack Gerard, president of the American Petroleum Institute, in remarks prepared for a speech today.

The institute represents more than 490 energy companies including Exxon Mobil Corp., the world’s largest company by market value.

 

 

Microsoft Bi Annual UpGrade

Several days ago there were annoying regularities on most computers. Some were delivered good sound and disrupted video and others Normal Video and disrupted or sound you could hardly hear. They apologized  as it took most of the day  and evening to rectify the situation The irregularities on this site were probably   due to Microsoft and not your computer. For those of you  that commented on it, I hope all is back to normal now.

 

Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles: Paving the Way to Commercial Success

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Research focuses on boosting reliability, reducing costs, and designing infrastructure of the future.
As nations around the world pursue sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for consumers and automakers alike. Automakers have made steady progress reducing the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs ) in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020.
Although fuel cell technologies are proven and effective, deployment challenges persist—particularly in terms of further reducing the cost and increasing the durability of fuel cells and getting sufficient infrastructure in place to support widespread consumer use. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are collaborating with industry partners to remove some of these barriers.
In-line Diagnostics Help Reduce Cost, Improve Reliability
As the fuel cell manufacturing industry moves from small- to large-scale production, quality control is essential. Using NREL developed in-line diagnostics, manufacturers can more effectively identify defects in fuel cell components, leading to higher production volumes, improved reliability, and lower costs.

NREL’s Keith Wipke explains how a fuel cell electric vehicle works at an advanced vehicle ride-and-drive event at the NREL Education Center.
Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL
photo_news1_25248_large“The cost impact of defects could be huge,” said Senior Engineer Michael Ulsh. “A fuel cell stack can consist of hundreds of components. Because a single component failure could affect the whole stack, a 10% composite stack failure rate could drive up stack cost by 60%.”
To help address this challenge, researchers use an NREL-developed optical reflectance system to identify defects in fuel cell membranes and apply active infrared imaging techniques to identify defects in electrode materials. These methods have been validated on a small-scale manufacturing line that can convey fuel cell component materials at speeds of 100 feet per minute.
Supporting a Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout
NREL recently joined H2USA, a public-private partnership designed to promote the widespread adoption of FCEVs. This new partnership focuses on overcoming the hurdles associated with establishing a robust hydrogen infrastructure.
“NREL’s participation in this partnership builds on the lab’s extensive fuel cell and hydrogen technology validation and analysis experience,” said Jen Kurtz, manager of the hydrogen analysis group. “Our hydrogen systems analysis staff will collaborate with a team of analysts from other national labs, universities, and key stakeholder groups to evaluate infrastructure roll-out strategies and the business case for commercialization.”

Fuel cell electric vehicles fill up at NREL’s hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses hydrogen made via renewable electrolysis.
Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL
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This team will combine analytic capabilities refined over many years of systems analysis to understand the technical, market, and investment challenges associated with the transition to hydrogen, electric, and other alternative fuel vehicles. NREL will contribute a suite of modeling and analysis capabilities developed over the last decade in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office as well as technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; and market transformation expertise.
Renewable Hydrogen FCEVs
Because hydrogen can be made from a variety of domestic resources, FCEVs reduce our nation’s dependence on imported oil and diversify our transportation-related energy sources. While most hydrogen is currently produced from natural gas, NREL is investigating renewable hydrogen production technologies that tap into energy from the sun and wind.
“Here at NREL, we have four FCEVs on loan from Toyota that fill up on renewable hydrogen—wind turbines and solar arrays power electrolyzers that split water into hydrogen and oxygen,” Kurtz said. “We showcase these and other advanced vehicles at public events to raise awareness about the alternative transportation options available today and on the horizon.”
—Written by Julia Thomas

Salt of the Earth: What You Need to Know about Natural Sea Salt

Unprocessed salts from around the world are a treat for your palate—and your well being.
By Sophia V. Schweitzer
May/June 2002

Salts courtesy The Spice House, Milwaukee, Wisconsin / Photos by Joe Coca

“In it, we taste infinitude,” Chilean poet Pablo Neruda wrote of salt in Elementary Odes (Odas Elementales, 1954). Salt has been called the dust of the ocean and the essence of life. Salt is sacred. Entire civilizations have risen around it. It’s part of wedding ceremonies and religious offerings around the world. In Hawaiian tradition, the elders use salt as a purifier in all medicine and ritual. Our word “salary” is a daily reminder that salt served as legal tender in ancient Roman times.
Salt is vital to our health and well-being. There is nothing more elementally of this planet, and of who we are, than its shimmering crystals and its unmistakable taste.
But not all salts are the same. The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, published in China in 2700 bc, discusses more than forty different kinds. And in recent years, expensive, glittering sea salts are replacing regular, cheap table salts in the kitchens of natural homes and celebrity chefs. So what’s going on?
The salt crop
Whether mined inland from ancient deposits or evaporated along coastal shores, all salts originate in the sea. In its natural form, salt consists of eighty-plus different minerals, including calcium, magnesium, sulfur, copper, potassium and yes, even gold. The stuff that gives salt its characteristic saltiness, sodium chloride, makes up about 78 percent of this highly variable mix.
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Natural sea salt is harvested from coves, exposed rocks, or tidal basins. Artisan salt farmers often channel and rake the salty watersheds, then gather the exposed crystals by hand. Unrefined, this salt is ready for use just as it is.
Commercial sea salts are harvested mechanically, then treated with chemicals and additives until they measure a minimum of 98 percent sodium chloride. All the other minerals are removed. Far removed in manufacturing and taste from their natural source, these refined salts are like cheap wines—hard on body, mind, and soul, and better left alone.
Chef’s secret
In a recent survey conducted by Relais & Châteaux, 68 percent of chefs felt that salt is the one ingredient that can always make a food taste better. To many of them, nothing compares to unrefined, organic sea salt, dried in the sun.
“You use salt not to give food a salt flavor,” explains chef George Mavrothalassitis, owner of Chef Mavro Restaurant in Honolulu, “but to enhance and intensify the natural flavors that already exist. Regular salt is aggressive and takes away from the food. Natural salt is soft and sweet.” A Marseilles native, Mavrothalassitis relies on fine French sel de mer from Camargue, and for his signature snapper in a salt crust, he favors Hawaiian salt from the islands’ lava cliffs. He also prefers alaea salt, Hawaiian salt enriched with baked red clay. Chefs love alaea as much for its earthiness as for its rusty color. They may sprinkle it on seared white scallops or add a touch to grilled zucchini.

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